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Replication of elite music performance enhancement following alpha/theta neurofeedback and application to novice performance and improvisation with SMR benefits

Gruzelier, John; Holmes, P.; Hirst, L.; Bulpin, K.; Rahman, S.; van Run, C. and Leach, J.. 2014. Replication of elite music performance enhancement following alpha/theta neurofeedback and application to novice performance and improvisation with SMR benefits. Biological Psychology, 95, pp. 96-107. ISSN 0301-0511 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Alpha/theta (A/T) and sensory-motor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback were compared in university instrumentalists who were novice singers with regard to prepared and improvised instrumental and vocal performance in three music domains: creativity/musicality, technique and communication/presentation. Only A/T training enhanced advanced playing seen in all three domains by expert assessors and validated by correlations with learning indices, strongest with Creativity/Musicality as shown by Egner and Gruzelier (2003). Here A/T gains extended to novice performance – prepared vocal, improvised vocal and instrumental – and were recognised by a lay audience who judged the prepared folk songs. SMR learning correlated positively with Technical Competence and Communication in novice performance, in keeping with SMR neurofeedback's known impact on lower-order processes such as attention, working memory and psychomotor skills. The importance of validation through learning indices was emphasised in the interpretation of neurofeedback outcome.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.11.001

Additional Information:

The research was supported by a grant from the National Endowment for Science, Technology and Arts (NESTA). We thank the participants and accompanists and support of EEG Spectrum and Thought Technology.

Keywords:

Neurofeedback; Alpha/theta; SMR; Music; Creativity; Improvisation

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
January 2014Published

Item ID:

11292

Date Deposited:

18 Feb 2015 11:11

Last Modified:

30 Jun 2017 15:27

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11292

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