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Gendering pastoral power: masculinity, affective labour and competitive bonds of solidarity among Filipino migrant men in Saudi Arabia

Johnson, Mark. 2017. Gendering pastoral power: masculinity, affective labour and competitive bonds of solidarity among Filipino migrant men in Saudi Arabia. Gender, Place and Culture A Journal of Feminist Geography, 24(6), pp. 823-833. ISSN 0966-369X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This article draws on Foucault’s concept of pastoral power to understand Filipino men’s care work and the making of migrant masculinities in Saudi Arabia. Feminist scholars have indicated the gendered nature of pastoral power and emphasized what Young refers to as the ‘logic of masculinist protection’ that characterizes the contemporary security state. However, the notion of pastoral power invites further consideration of the taken for granted cultural assumptions about the way that hegemonic masculinity and forms of homosociality are characterized mainly by aggression, competition and dominance. Men’s talk about and practical involvement in assisting fellow migrants in diasporic settings foregrounds the way that an ethics of care runs up against and is entangled with the competitive bonds of masculine solidarities. While markers of material success are privileged in measuring migrant men’s accomplishments in country of origin, practices of care become central to men’s achievement of symbolic power and social legitimacy especially among their peers in the diaspora. That spatialization is also linked to temporally shifting models of masculinity and normative expectations about men over the life course.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369X.2015.1090411

Keywords:

Masculinity, migration, pastoral power, care, affective labour

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Anthropology

Dates:

DateEvent
2017Published
7 November 2015Published Online
11 July 2015Accepted

Item ID:

17939

Date Deposited:

19 Apr 2016 09:51

Last Modified:

13 Jul 2018 18:06

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/17939

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