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Collective Narcissism and the Growth of Conspiracy Thinking over the Course of the 2016 United States Presidential Election: A Longitudinal Analysis

Golec de Zavala, Agnieszka and Federico, Christopher. 2018. Collective Narcissism and the Growth of Conspiracy Thinking over the Course of the 2016 United States Presidential Election: A Longitudinal Analysis. European Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0046-2772 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Using data from a longitudinal study of American adults collected between July and November 2016, we examine the hypothesis that American collective narcissism would uniquely predict increases in conspiracy thinking during the 2016 presidential campaign. Going beyond previous findings, our results indicate that collective narcissism (but not in-group identification) predicted growth in general conspiracy thinking—i.e., a tendency to view political events in terms of group-based conspiracies—over the course of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. This relationship is found even after accounting for other predictors such as demographics, political knowledge, social trust, authoritarianism, and need for cognitive closure.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2496

Keywords:

Collective narcissism, conspiracy thinking, presidential campaign

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
18 April 2018Published Online
6 April 2018Accepted

Item ID:

23605

Date Deposited:

02 Jul 2018 14:48

Last Modified:

12 Jul 2018 21:37

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/23605

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