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The influence of contextual information regarding the breakdown of relationships and perpetrator-target sex composition on perceptions of relational stalking

Scott, A.J.; Duff, S.C.; Sheridan, L. and Rajakaruna, N.. 2018. The influence of contextual information regarding the breakdown of relationships and perpetrator-target sex composition on perceptions of relational stalking. Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

The present study examines the influence of prior relationship (with contextual information regarding the breakdown of the relationship) and perpetrator-target sex composition on perceptions of relational stalking. The study employed an experimental 7 × 2 independent measures design, and the sample comprised 1,260 members of the community residing in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. Participants received one of 14 versions of a hypothetical scenario and responded to scale items concerning the situation described. The situation was perceived to be most serious when the perpetrator was a stranger or a physically violent ex-partner and least serious when the perpetrator was an ex-partner of
an unfaithful target. Scenarios involving a male perpetrator and a female victim were also perceived to be more serious than scenarios involving a female perpetrator and a male target. It is apparent therefore that the context of the relationship breakdown and the sex of the perpetrator and target significantly influence perceptions of relational stalking.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2018.1529231

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Forensic Psychology Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
20 September 2018Accepted
5 October 2018Published

Item ID:

24551

Date Deposited:

11 Oct 2018 10:06

Last Modified:

25 Mar 2019 13:46

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/24551

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