Research Online

Logo

Goldsmiths - University of London

Faster decline of pitch memory over time in congenital amusia

Stewart, Lauren; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Deutsch, Diana; McDonald, Claire and Williamson, V. J.. 2010. Faster decline of pitch memory over time in congenital amusia. Advances in Cognitive Psychology, 6(1), pp. 15-22. ISSN 1895-1171 [Article]

[img]
Preview
Text
PSY_Stewart_2010_Cognitive_Psychology.pdf - Published Version

Download (290kB) | Preview

Abstract or Description

Congenital amusia (amusia, hereafter) is a developmental disorder that impacts negatively on the perception of music. Psychophysical testing suggests that individuals with amusia have above average thresholds for detection of pitch change and pitch direction discrimination; however, a low-level auditory perceptual problem cannot completely explain the disorder, since discrimination of melodies is also impaired when the constituent intervals are suprathreshold for perception. The aim of the present study was to test pitch memory as a function of (a) time and (b) tonal interference, in order to determine whether pitch traces are inherently weaker in amusic individuals. Memory for the pitch of single tones was compared using two versions of a paradigm developed by Deutsch (1970a). In both tasks, participants compared the pitch of a standard (S) versus a comparison (C) tone. In the time task, the S and C tones were presented, separated in time by 0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 s (blocked presentation). In the interference task, the S and C tones were presented with a fixed time interval (5 s) but with a variable number of irrelevant tones in between: 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 tones (blocked presentation). In the time task, control performance remained high for all time in tervals, but amusics showed a performance decrement over time. In the interference task, controls and amusics showed a similar performance decrement with increasing number of irrelevant tones. Overall, the results suggest that the pitch representations of amusic individuals are less stable and more prone to decay than those of matched non-amusic individuals.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.2478/v10053-008-0073-5

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2010Published

Item ID:

5449

Date Deposited:

29 Mar 2011 13:30

Last Modified:

09 Jul 2018 17:57

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/5449

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)