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Generating inferences from written and spoken language: A comparison of children with visual impairment and children with sight

Edmonds, Caroline, J. and Pring, Linda. 2006. Generating inferences from written and spoken language: A comparison of children with visual impairment and children with sight. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 24, pp. 337-351. ISSN 0261-510X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

The two experiments reported here investigated the ability of sighted children and children with visual impairment to comprehend text and, in particular, to draw inferences both while reading and while listening. Children were assigned into ‘comprehension skill’ groups, depending on the degree to which their reading comprehension skill was in line with that predicted by their decoding skill. They then read (either print or Braille) and listened to a series of novel short stories. These were followed by a series of questions, which required either the generation of inferences, or an answer that could be taken literally from the text. The results suggest that children with and without sight are comparable in their ability to draw inferences, and that children with visual impairment show an advantage for literal questions under auditory presentation.

Item Type: Article

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2006Published

Item ID:

5738

Date Deposited:

02 Aug 2011 12:06

Last Modified:

07 Dec 2012 12:56

URI: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/5738
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