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Associations between vascular risk and mood in euthymic older adults: Preliminary findings

Charlton, Rebecca A. 2014. Associations between vascular risk and mood in euthymic older adults: Preliminary findings. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(9), pp. 936-945. ISSN 1064-7481 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Objectives

Vascular risk has been associated with late-life depression, but it is less certain whether it is also associated with the endorsement of depressive symptoms among euthymic older adults. We explore whether vascular risk is associated with endorsement of depressive symptoms among euthymic older adults and examine associations with cognitive function.

Methods

Fifty-seven adults (50–89 years), were assessed for: 1) vascular risk (Framingham Stroke Risk Profile, FSRP); 2) depressive mood (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression, CESD self-rating questionnaire; Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, HDRS clinical interview); and 3) cognitive domains, (Learning and Memory, L-M; Attention and Information Processing, AIP; Executive Function, EF; Semantic Language, SL).

Results

Significant correlations were observed between FSRP and both depression scales, independent of age. No significant correlations were observed between HDRS and any cognitive domain; in contrast, CESD correlated significantly with L-M, AIP and EF but not SL. FSRP correlated significantly with L-M and EF measures only. Regression analyses revealed that 11.5% of the variance in HDRS scores was explained by FSRP, whereas CESD scores were explained by EF (20.8% of variance).

Conclusions

Vascular risk was associated with endorsement of depressive symptoms in euthymic older adults. However, the patterns of associations with the two depression scales are distinct and may reflect both differences in administration and item characteristics. A limitation of this study was the exclusion of individuals with subclinical depression, leading to a restricted range on depression scales; future studies should include a full population sample to more fully explore low mood in late-life.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2013.01.074

Keywords:

Aging; cardiovascular risk; depression.

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
September 2014Published

Item ID:

9463

Date Deposited:

08 Nov 2013 08:23

Last Modified:

30 Jun 2017 14:11

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/9463

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