Autonomy of Migration Despite Its Securitisation? Facing the Terms and Conditions of Biometric Rebordering

Scheel, Stephan. 2013. Autonomy of Migration Despite Its Securitisation? Facing the Terms and Conditions of Biometric Rebordering. Millennium, 41(3), pp. 575-600. ISSN 0305-8298 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This article reconsiders the concept of autonomy of migration in the context of technologically ever-more sophisticated border regimes by focusing on the case of biometric rebordering. As its name suggests, the concept of autonomy of migration’s core thesis proposes that migratory movements yield moments of autonomy in regards to any attempt to control and regulate them. Yet, the concept of autonomy of migration has been repeatedly accused of being based on and contributing to a romanticisation of migration. After outlining two advantages the concept of autonomy of migration offers for the analysis of biometric border regimes, I demonstrate that processes of biometric rebordering increase the warranty of the two allegations, which feed this major critique. Drawing on examples relating to the Visa Information System, I show that processes of biometric rebordering alter the practical terms and material conditions for moments of autonomy of migration to such an extent that it becomes necessary to rethink not only some of the concept of autonomy of migration’s central features, but the notion of autonomy itself. In the final section, I therefore point out some directions to develop the concept of autonomy of migration as an approach, which is better equipped to investigate today’s struggles of migration without being prone to the critique of implicating a romanticisation of migration.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1177/0305829813484186

Keywords:

Autonomy of Migration, Biometric Borders, Securitisation, Security Dispositif, Situated Knowledge

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology

Dates:

DateEvent
June 2013Published

Item ID:

11149

Date Deposited:

19 Jan 2015 10:03

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 16:05

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11149

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