Recordings, Rights and Risks: Intermediaries and the Changing Music Industries

Negus, Keith. 2014. Recordings, Rights and Risks: Intermediaries and the Changing Music Industries. Civilisations: Revue Internationale D’Anthropologie et de Sciences Humaines, 13, pp. 113-136. ISSN 2032-0442 [Article]

[img]
Preview
Text
Negus Recording, Risk, Rights.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract or Description

The new millennium has seen a proliferation of intermediaries working within, across and out from the music industries, and a rich variety of new working practices and relationships in response to changes in music commerce brought about by digitalisation. Historically, since early in the twentieth century, the music industry has been undergoing a process of adaptation from one core revenue-generating product (recording) towards a system of interdependent commodities whereby market value is realised relatively and cumulatively through connections that link various musical commodities (recordings, still and moving images, dramas, books, games, experiences, events, merchandise, services and so on). As the revenues from direct sale of recordings to consumers has declined and the importance of rights revenue has increased, older risks and uncertainties about musicians and their listeners have been reconfigured, compounded by the cultural consequences of digitalisation, and the waves of data produced via digitalisation. Within this context, music companies have been devolving responsibility for risk by allowing interventions from nation state, civic and commercial intermediaries and drawing into the networks of music production a wider range of investors, regulators, stakeholders, entrepreneurs, activists and beneficiaries.

Item Type:

Article

Related URLs:

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Music > Popular Music Research Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
2014Published

Item ID:

10742

Date Deposited:

10 Oct 2014 14:20

Last Modified:

19 Jun 2020 15:02

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/10742

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)