Independent effects of personality and sex on self-estimated intelligence: evidence from Austria

Stieger, Stefan; Kastner, Cornelia K.; Voracek, Martin; Von Stumm, Sophie; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas and Furnham, Adrian. 2010. Independent effects of personality and sex on self-estimated intelligence: evidence from Austria. Psychological Reports, 107(2), pp. 553-563. ISSN 0033-2941 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

The effects of sex and personality traits on self-estimates of intelligence were examined in a sample of 302 Austrian adults (143 men, 159 women). Confirming previous research, men had higher self-estimates of logical and spatial abilities than did women, and these differences were partly explained in terms of women's higher Neuroticism scores. Neuroticism (negatively) and Openness (positively) accounted significantly for variances in self-estimates of spatial and logical intelligence. However, sex had stronger direct and indirect effects on self-estimates of intelligence. Sex and personality effects appear to be largely independent. Thus, being male, emotionally stable, and open to new experiences is likely to result in higher self-estimates of spatial and logical abilities.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.2466/04.07.09.PR0.107.5.553-563

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2010Published

Item ID:

11233

Date Deposited:

28 Jan 2015 12:32

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 13:56

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11233

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