Embodying deficiency through ‘affective practice’: Shame, relationality, and the lived experience of social class and gender in higher education

Loveday, Vik. 2016. Embodying deficiency through ‘affective practice’: Shame, relationality, and the lived experience of social class and gender in higher education. Sociology, 50(6), pp. 1140-1155. ISSN 0038-0385 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Based on empirical research with participants from working-class backgrounds studying and working in higher education (HE) in England, the article examines the lived experience of shame. Building on a feminist Bourdieusian approach to social class analysis, the article contends that ‘struggles for value’ within the field of HE precipitate classed judgements, which have the potential to generate shame. Through an examination of the ‘affective practice’ of judgement, the article explores the contingencies that precipitate shame and the embodiment of deficiency. The paper links the classed and gendered dimensions of shame with valuation, arguing that the fundamental relationality of social class and gender is not only generative of shame, but that shame helps in turn to structure both working-class experience and a view of the working classes as ‘deficient’.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1177/0038038515589301

Additional Information:

The article draws on research supported by the ESRC (grant number ES/F022387/1).

Keywords:

Affect, deficiency, embodiment, gender, practice, social class, shame, value.

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology

Dates:

DateEvent
1 December 2016Published
30 June 2015Published Online

Item ID:

11583

Date Deposited:

15 May 2015 09:45

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 16:10

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11583

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