A psychologically based taxonomy of Magicians’ forcing Techniques: How magicians influence our choices, and how to use this to study psychological mechanisms

Pailhes, Alice; Rensink, Ronald A. and Kuhn, Gustav. 2020. A psychologically based taxonomy of Magicians’ forcing Techniques: How magicians influence our choices, and how to use this to study psychological mechanisms. Consciousness and Cognition, 86, 103038. ISSN 1053-8100 [Article]

No full text available
[img] Text
TAXONOMY-CONSCCOG-REVISED-Final.pdf - Accepted Version
Permissions: Administrator Access Only until 1 November 2022.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (828kB)

Abstract or Description

Magicians have developed a wide range of techniques to influence and control spectators’ choices of such things as card, word, or number. These techniques are what is called forcing. The present paper develops a psychologically-based taxonomy of forcing techniques with two goals in mind. Firstly, it should help uncover the different psychological mechanisms that underlie forcing techniques. Secondly, it should facilitate knowledge transfer between magicians and psychologists. The main division present two basic categories that can be used as a way of focussing separately on (1) decision-making processes and external influences on choices, and (2) links between sense of agency over action and outcome as well as the illusion of control over this outcome. This taxonomy allows us to clearly differentiate between forces in which there is or is not a free choice, and whether this choice has an impact on the following events.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2020.103038

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
10 October 2020Accepted
1 November 2020Published Online

Item ID:

29775

Date Deposited:

26 Feb 2021 11:07

Last Modified:

04 Aug 2021 02:40

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/29775

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)