Real-time auditory feedback may reduce abnormal movements in patients with chronic stroke

Douglass-Kirk, Pedro; Grierson, Mick; Ward, Nick S.; Brander, Fran; Kelly, Kate; Chegwidden, Will; Shivji, Dhiren and Stewart, Lauren. 2022. Real-time auditory feedback may reduce abnormal movements in patients with chronic stroke. Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288 [Article] (In Press)

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Abstract or Description

Purpose
The current pilot study assesses the use of real-time auditory feedback to help reduce abnormal movements during an active reaching task in patients with chronic stroke.

Materials and methods
20 patients with chronic stroke completed the study with full datasets (age: M = 53 SD = 14; sex: male = 75%; time since stroke in months: M = 34, SD = 33). Patients undertook 100 repetitions of an active reaching task while listening to self-selected music which automatically muted when abnormal movement was detected, determined by thresholds set by clinical therapists. A within-subject design with two conditions (with auditory feedback vs. without auditory feedback) presented in a randomised counterbalanced order was used. The dependent variable was the duration of abnormal movement as a proportion of trial duration.

Results
A significant reduction in the duration of abnormal movement was observed when patients received auditory feedback, F(1,18) = 9.424, p = 0.007, with a large effect size (partial η2 = 0.344).

Conclusions
Patients with chronic stroke can make use of real-time auditory feedback to increase the proportion of time they spend in optimal movement patterns. The approach provides a motivating framework that encourages high dose with a key focus on quality of movement.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2022.2037751

Additional Information:

The first author disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research: This work was supported by the Economic and Social Research Council: grant number ES/J500124/1.

Keywords:

Rehabilitation; compensation; movement; machine learning; kinematics

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
30 January 2022Accepted
3 March 2022Published Online

Item ID:

31567

Date Deposited:

08 Mar 2022 10:29

Last Modified:

08 Mar 2022 10:36

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/31567

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