Relocating the education reform movement: how have universities in Taiwan experienced Neoliberalization?

Peng, Ming-Te. 2022. Relocating the education reform movement: how have universities in Taiwan experienced Neoliberalization? Asia Pacific Education Review, ISSN 1598-1037 [Article] (In Press)

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Abstract or Description

Based on the higher education reform experience in Taiwan, this research elucidates the conditions for the marketization of universities. It draws on critical discourse analysis to explore power relations between higher education, society, and the government and suggests that the university has always been considered a valuable resource for state development. By analyzing the heterogeneity of discourses used in official documents and the academic literature, this research identifies the social contradictions that triggered the education reform movement in the 1990s, including humanistic resistance against economic utility, educational inequality, and demand for academic autonomy. Neoliberalization in higher education is shown as a contemporary model for mobilizing academic resources in indirect but effective ways, with the aim of mapping both neoliberal practices in Taiwan and their connections with the global trend of marketizing higher education.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12564-022-09765-6

Additional Information:

Funding was provided by Ministry of Education (Taiwan) and Government Scholarships for Overseas Study.

Keywords:

Neoliberalism, Higher education policy, University management, Marketization

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology

Dates:

DateEvent
12 April 2022Accepted
6 May 2022Published Online

Item ID:

31939

Date Deposited:

23 Jun 2022 09:46

Last Modified:

23 Jun 2022 09:46

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/31939

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