'The Girl Effect': Exploring Narratives of Gendered Impacts and Opportunities in Neoliberal Development

Shain, Farzana. 2013. 'The Girl Effect': Exploring Narratives of Gendered Impacts and Opportunities in Neoliberal Development. Sociological Research Online, 18(2), pp. 181-191. [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This paper explores representations of girls in current discourses of neoliberal development through an analysis of a range of texts that promote the global Girl Effect movement. These representations are situated in the context of theoretical debates about gender mainstreaming and policy developments that construct girls and women's 'empowerment' as 'smart economics'. The paper draws on postcolonial and transnational feminist analyses that critique market-led approaches to development and their complicities in the dynamics of neo-colonialism and uneven development, to contextualise the Girl Effect movement. It is argued that the Girl Effect movement draws on colonial stereotypes of girls as sexually and culturally constrained, but reworks these through the discourses of neoliberal development to construct girls as good investment potential. In doing so, it reproduces a dominant narrative that highlights the cultural causes of poverty but obscures structural relations of exploitation and privilege.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.5153/sro.2962

Keywords:

Girls, gender, neoliberalism, World Bank, Girl Effect, neoliberal development

Related URLs:

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Educational Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
5 March 2013Accepted
31 May 2013Published

Item ID:

28283

Date Deposited:

24 Mar 2020 10:17

Last Modified:

24 Mar 2020 10:17

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/28283

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