Mapping the Drugged Body: Telling Different Kinds of Drug-using Stories

Dennis, Fay. 2020. Mapping the Drugged Body: Telling Different Kinds of Drug-using Stories. Body & Society, 26(3), pp. 61-93. ISSN 1357-034X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Drugged bodies are commonly depicted as passive, suffering and abject, which makes it hard for them to be known in other ways. Wanting to get closer to these alternative bodies and their resourcefulness for living, I turned to body-mapping as an inventive method for telling different kinds of drug-using stories. Drawing on a research project with people who inject heroin and crack cocaine in London, UK, I employed body-mapping as a way of studying drugged bodies in their relation to others, human and non-human, in the injecting event. I invited participants to draw their bodies in describing these otherwise hard-to-articulate experiences. Following Donna Haraway, I conceptualise body-mapping as a more-than-human mode of storytelling where different kinds of bodies can be known. Here, I look at three such bodies – sensing-bodies, temporal-bodies and environment-bodies – and argue that it is through being able to respond to such bodies that more hospitable ways of living with drugs can become possible.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1177/1357034X20925530

Additional Information:

This research was funded by an Economic and Social Research Council PhD Studentship.

Keywords:

body-mapping, Haraway, injecting drug use, storytelling, the drugged body, visual methods

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology > Centre for Invention and Social Process (CISP) [2016-]

Dates:

DateEvent
23 March 2020Accepted
23 October 2020Published Online
September 2020Published

Item ID:

29049

Date Deposited:

21 Jul 2020 10:08

Last Modified:

26 Jan 2021 14:59

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/29049

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