Pedunculopontine-Induced cortical decoupling as the neurophysiological locus of dissociation

Smith, D. M. and Terhune, Devin Blair. 2022. Pedunculopontine-Induced cortical decoupling as the neurophysiological locus of dissociation. Psychological Review, ISSN 0033-295X [Article] (In Press)

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Abstract or Description

Mounting evidence suggests an association between aberrant sleep phenomena and dissociative experiences. However, no wake-sleep boundary theory provides a compelling explanation of dissociation or specifies its physiological substrates. We present a theoretical account of dissociation that integrates theories and empirical results from multiple lines of research concerning the domain of dissociation and the regulation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.
This theory posits that individual differences in the circuitry governing the REM sleep promoting Pedunculopontine Nucleus and Laterodorsal Tegmental Nucleus determine the degree of similarity in the cortical connectivity profiles of wakefulness and REM sleep. We propose that a latent trait characterized by elevated dissociative experiences emerges from the decoupling of frontal executive regions due to a REM sleep-like aminergic/cholinergic balance. The
Pedunculopontine Induced Cortical Decoupling Account of Dissociation (PICDAD) suggests multiple fruitful lines of inquiry and provides novel insights.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1037/rev0000353

Additional Information:

©American Psychological Association, 2021. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. The final article is available, upon publication, at Psychological Review.”

Keywords:

Dissociation, Suggestibility, REM Sleep, Pedunculopontine Nucleus, Functional Connectivity

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
12 December 2021Accepted
27 January 2022Published Online

Item ID:

30968

Date Deposited:

05 Jan 2022 10:29

Last Modified:

31 Jan 2022 11:04

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/30968

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