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Aetiological overlap between anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity symptom dimensions in adolescence

Michelini, G; Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M. and McAdams, T.A.. 2014. Aetiological overlap between anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity symptom dimensions in adolescence. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 0-0. ISSN 0021-9630 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Background: Anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity (ADH) problems are common in adolescence, often co-occur, and are characterised by high heterogeneity in their phenotypic expressions. Although it is known that anxiety and ADH problems correlate, the relationships between subtypes of anxiety and ADH problems have been scarcely investigated. Methods: Using a large population sample of adolescent twins and siblings we explored the phenotypic and aetiological association between anxiety subtypes (panic/agoraphobia, separation anxiety, social anxiety, physical injury fears, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and generalised anxiety) and the two ADH dimensions (attention problems and hyperactivity/impulsivity). Both phenotypes were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Results: The association between ADH problems and anxiety could be entirely attributed to attention problems, not hyperactivity/impulsivity. Most of the correlations between anxiety subtypes and attention problems showed an approximately equal role of genetic and non-shared environmental factors. Conclusions: The high heterogeneity within anxiety and ADH problems should be taken into account in order to better understand comorbidity between them.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12318

Additional Information:

Waves 1–3 of the G1219 study were supported by the W T Grant Foundation, the University of London Central Research Fund and a Medical Research Council (MRC) Training Fellowship and Career Development Award (to T.C.E.). G.M. is supported by a doctoral studentship from the MRC Social, Genetic Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. T.A.M. is supported by the Leverhulme Trust (RPG-210). The authors declare no conflicts of interests.

Keywords:

anxiety, ADH problems, genetics, twins, adolescence

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
7 September 2014Published

Item ID:

10522

Date Deposited:

25 Jul 2014 09:14

Last Modified:

01 Aug 2018 12:37

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/10522

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