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The Relevance of Ethnomusicological Research and Theory to Music Therapy Practice, Research, Education and Policy

Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Muriel Elsbeth. 2012. 'The Relevance of Ethnomusicological Research and Theory to Music Therapy Practice, Research, Education and Policy'. In: Mozart and Science 2012: Musik in Medizin und Therapie, 4. internationaler Kongress der Musikwirkungsforschung (Music in Medicine and Therapy, 4th International Conference of Research into Music’s Effects). Krems, Austria. [Conference or Workshop Item]

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Abstract or Description

This poster will examine why ethnomusicological research methodologies are relevant to music therapy, practice, research and education. This approach is different to Culture-Centred/ Community Music Therapy because it embraces:
1.Non-Western definitions/ models of wellbeing and ‘music’ (sometimes including movement)
2.Culturally appropriate research methodologies (eg. interviews are not always appropriate)
3.Practices use culturally appropriate/ context specific musics based on non-Western (uses of) music to promote wellbeing.
4.Practices which do not stereotype or essentialise the cultural groups seeking to improve wellbeing.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Additional Information:

The author is a visiting fellow in the Music, Mind and Brain research centre and research development officer at Goldsmiths, London.

Keywords:

ethnomusicology, research, practice, theory, music, therapy, education, policy, epistemologies, methodologies

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
9 November 2012["eprint_fieldopt_dates_date_type_shown" not defined]

Event Location:

Krems, Austria

Item ID:

10534

Date Deposited:

30 Jul 2014 07:47

Last Modified:

12 Jul 2018 05:24

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/10534

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