Damage to the salience network and interactions with the default mode network

Jilka, Sagar R; Scott, Gregory; Ham, Timothy; Pickering, Alan; Bonnelle, Valerie; Braga, Rodrigo M; Leech, Robert and Sharp, David J. 2014. Damage to the salience network and interactions with the default mode network. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(33), pp. 10798-10807. ISSN 0270-6474 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Interactions between the Salience Network (SN) and the Default Mode Network (DMN) are thought to be important for cognitive control. However, evidence for a causal relationship between the networks is limited. Previously, we have reported that traumatic damage to white matter tracts within the SN predicts abnormal DMN function. Here we investigate the effect of this damage on network interactions that accompany changing motor control. We initially used fMRI of the Stop Signal Task to study response inhibition in humans. In healthy subjects, functional connectivity (FC) between the right anterior insula (rAI), a key node of the SN, and the DMN transiently increased during stopping. This change in FC was not seen in a group of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with impaired cognitive control. Furthermore, the amount of SN tract damage negatively correlated with FC between the networks. We confirmed these findings in a second group of TBI patients. Here, switching rather than inhibiting a motor response: (1) was accompanied by a similar increase in network FC in healthy controls; (2) was not seen in TBI patients; and (3) tract damage after TBI again correlated with FC breakdown. This shows that coupling between the rAI and DMN increases with cognitive control and that damage within the SN impairs this dynamic network interaction. This work provides compelling evidence for a model of cognitive control where the SN is involved in the attentional capture of salient external stimuli and signals the DMN to reduce its activity when attention is externally focused.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0518-14.2014

Additional Information:

This work was supported by the Medical Research Council (United Kingdom) and the National Institute of Health
Research Professorship (RP-011-048).

Keywords:

default mode network,functional connectivity,psychophysiological interactions,salience network,traumatic brain injury

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
13 August 2014Published
28 May 2014Accepted

Item ID:

10569

Date Deposited:

14 Aug 2014 07:43

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 16:00

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/10569

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