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Far-space neglect in conjunction but not feature search following transcranial magnetic stimulation over right posterior parietal cortex

Mahayana, Indra T.; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chang, Chi Fu; Hung, Daisy L.; Tzeng, Ovid J. L.; Juan, Chi-Hung and Muggleton, Neil G.. 2014. Far-space neglect in conjunction but not feature search following transcranial magnetic stimulation over right posterior parietal cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology, 111(4), pp. 705-714. ISSN 0022-3077 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Near- and far-space coding in the human brain is a dynamic process. Areas in dorsal, as well as ventral visual association cortex, including right posterior parietal cortex (rPPC), right frontal eye field (rFEF), and right ventral occipital cortex (rVO), have been shown to be important in visuospatial processing, but the involvement of these areas when the information is in near or far space remains unclear. There is a need for investigations of these representations to help explain the pathophysiology of hemispatial neglect, and the role of near and far space is crucial to this. We used a conjunction visual search task using an elliptical array to investigate the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered over rFEF, rPPC, and rVO on the processing of targets in near and far space and at a range of horizontal eccentricities. As in previous studies, we found that rVO was involved in far-space search, and rFEF was involved regardless of the distance to the array. It was found that rPPC was involved in search only in far space, with a neglect-like effect when the target was located in the most eccentric locations. No effects were seen for any site for a feature search task. As the search arrays had higher predictability with respect to target location than is often the case, these data may form a basis for clarifying both the role of PPC in visual search and its contribution to neglect, as well as the importance of near and far space in these.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00492.2013

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
15 February 2014Published

Item ID:

10761

Date Deposited:

15 Oct 2014 09:45

Last Modified:

28 Oct 2014 14:43

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/10761

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