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High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity

Romanska, Aleksandra; Rezlescu, Constantin; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley and Banissy, Michael J.. 2015. High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity. Cerebral Cortex, 25(11), pp. 4334-4340. ISSN 1047-3211 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of transcranial current stimulation as a tool to facilitate a variety of cognitive and perceptual abilities. Few studies, though, have examined the utility of this approach for the processing of social information. Here, we conducted 2 experiments to explore whether a single session of high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices would enhance facial identity perception. In Experiment 1, participants received 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS or sham stimulation prior to completing the tasks examining facial identity perception or trustworthiness perception. Active high-frequency tRNS facilitated facial identity perception, but not trustworthiness perception. Experiment 2 assessed the spatial specificity of this effect by delivering 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices or sensorimotor cortices prior to participants completing the same facial identity perception task used in Experiment 1. High-frequency tRNS targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices enhanced performance relative to motor cortex stimulation. These findings show that high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices produces task-specific and site-specific enhancements in face perception.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhv016

Additional Information:

This work was supported by grants from the British Academy (SG111874) and ESRC (ES/K00882X/1) awarded to M.J.B. A.R. was also supported by a Wellcome Trust Biomedical Vacation Scholarship (WT102340MA).

Keywords:

brain stimulation, face perception, facial identity, transcranial current stimulation, transcranial random noise stimulation

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
6 February 2015Published Online
1 November 2015Published

Item ID:

11337

Date Deposited:

23 Feb 2015 16:23

Last Modified:

21 Feb 2019 14:07

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11337

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