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Féministes de tous les pays, qui lave vos chaussettes?

Farris, Sara R.. 2015. Féministes de tous les pays, qui lave vos chaussettes? Comment s'en sortir?, 01(01), pp. 203-235. [Article]

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Abstract or Description

In this article I focus upon one largely overlooked point of convergence between state feminism, nationalist and neoliberal politics: namely, the policies pertaining to migrant women and ethnic minority's “economic” integration. I begin by showing that the demand that migrant and ethnic minority women participate in work is largely framed within a context of “workfare”. Second, I demonstrate that the implementation of these policies has functioned through actively directing migrant and ethnic minority women towards the care and domestic sectors, which has traditionally been conceived as “feminine”. The contradiction emerges when taking into account that it is precisely against this gendered division of labor – men in the public sphere, women in the private – that he feminist movement has historically struggled. To understand the conditions of possibility for, and the trajectory of, such a contradiction, I propose that we must reconstruct the
complex feminist genealogy of economic independence, and the related concepts of productive work, which is placed in opposition to social reproduction. This critical reconstruction enables us to better grasp how feminism has been integrated into what I call the ideology of femonationalism

Item Type:

Article

Related URLs:

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology

Dates:

DateEvent
26 May 2015Published

Item ID:

11794

Date Deposited:

24 Jun 2015 09:41

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 15:48

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/11794

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