Research Online

Logo

Goldsmiths - University of London

‘Aristocratic reform and the extirpation of Parliament in early Georgian Britain: Andrew Michael Ramsay and French ideas of monarchy,’

Mansfield, Andrew. 2014. ‘Aristocratic reform and the extirpation of Parliament in early Georgian Britain: Andrew Michael Ramsay and French ideas of monarchy,’. History of European Ideas, 40(2), pp. 185-203. ISSN 0191-6599 [Article]

No full text available

Abstract or Description

In An Essay upon Civil Government (1722), Andrew Michael Ramsay mounted a sustained attack upon the development throughout English history of popular government. According to Ramsay, popular involvement in sovereignty had led to the decline of society and the revolutions of the seventeenth century. In his own time, Parliament had become a despotic instrument of government, riven with faction and driven by a multiplicity of laws that manifested a widespread corruption in the state. Ramsay's solution to this degeneracy was the extirpation of Parliament, and its substitution with a monarchy moderated by an aristocratic senate. Ramsay's adoption of certain “Country” elements, including a return to the first principles of the constitution, claimed to reflect the principles of contemporary French aristocratic theory which called for the reform of government through the nobility. In his desire to exclude popular government, and reverse the decline of the state, however, Ramsay utilised the theory with which Bossuet had defended Louis XIV's absolute France. Intriguingly, traces of the natural law system which fortified Ramsay's theory can be found in Viscount Bolingbroke's subsequent attack on Walpole's Whig ministry and the corruption of the state.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2012.747256

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

History

Dates:

DateEvent
6 February 2014Published

Item ID:

12030

Date Deposited:

07 Jul 2015 15:33

Last Modified:

07 Jul 2015 15:33

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/12030

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)