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'"We each have to endure our own afterlife": Female Authorship, Narrative Fracture and The Appropriation of Classical Myth in Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad and Ursula Le Guin's Lavinia'

Richards, Jasmine. 2012. '"We each have to endure our own afterlife": Female Authorship, Narrative Fracture and The Appropriation of Classical Myth in Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad and Ursula Le Guin's Lavinia'. GLITS-e: a Journal of Criticism, 3, [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This paper examines the reading and rewriting practices undertaken by Margaret Atwood in The Penelopiad (2005) and Ursula Le Guin in Lavinia (2008). It explores the differing fractured narrative structures utilised in their respective appropriations of The Odyssey and The Aeneid in order to reinvent Penelope and Lavinia as female authors.Through the use of fractured narratives in The Penelopiad and Lavinia, the classical epic is represented as a set of unstable and historically contingent myths. [1]

Item Type:

Article

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

English and Comparative Literature

Dates:

DateEvent
2012Published

Item ID:

13373

Date Deposited:

14 Sep 2015 15:40

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2017 10:06

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/13373

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