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Citizen Smith more than Citizen Kane? Genres-in-progress and the cultural politics of difference

Saha, Anamik. 2013. Citizen Smith more than Citizen Kane? Genres-in-progress and the cultural politics of difference. South Asian Popular Culture, 11(1), pp. 97-102. ISSN 1474-6689 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

As the first British situation comedy about a Muslim family, Citizen Khan received mostly negative reviews from the press. Reviews could be split into two tropes: Citizen Khan was offensive to Muslims, or just offensively bad. It was the comedy's use of crude caricatures, compounded by its foundation in a rather archaic form of humour that seemingly rubbed up both white and Asian critics alike. However, this paper argues that much of this criticism failed to adequately contextualise Citizen Khan within the form of comedy that it is working within. Using Georgina Born's notion of ‘genre-in-progress’, the paper argues that it is only by situating Citizen Khan within its genre of British family sitcom that we can properly ascertain its cultural political value, where we find in fact something much more potentially subversive than the reviews give it credit for.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/14746689.2013.765234

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Media, Communications and Cultural Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
2013UNSPECIFIED

Item ID:

14914

Date Deposited:

18 Nov 2015 08:00

Last Modified:

27 Jun 2017 15:05

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/14914

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