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'Generation Cloud'

Barth, Jenn. 2011. 'Generation Cloud'. Rackspace Hosting, [Article]

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Abstract or Description

White Paper

We already have masses of information digitally stored and this amount is only going to increase. Many people’s worlds are online, or soon will be – we are the cloud generation. Our work and personal lives are more
‘connected’ than ever through devices like smartphones, tablets, Wi-Fi, broadband, social media, e-readers, emails and cloud-based services like Spotify, Flickr, Facebook, Gmail and Hotmail*.
Every day we’re using ‘the cloud’ more and more - often unknowingly - as we transition and deposit our lives online – music, movies, emails, photos, family videos, and even work data – using cloud services.
Just how reliant are we on these online services? How much of our information is held in or shared via the cloud. What are we typically sharing and hosting in the cloud every day? And could we be exposing ourselves and our ‘digital treasures’ to significant risks?
In collaboration with experts in the field of social studies and technology at CAST and supported by quantitative research among 2,000 UK adults, Rackspace analysed the ‘connected’ lives of 15 everyday people.
The result is a social study, Generation Cloud, which reveals the extent to which we have become reliant on cloud-based services.
The report outlines:
• The scale of our life lived in the cloud - the value of our personal clouds and digital inheritance
• Emergence of four distinct social profiles of cloud users
• 2020: How the cloud will make physical books, CDs and DVDs a thing of the past
The report concludes with suggested hints and tips on how users can stay safe in the cloud, and how businesses can address issues raised in the study.

Item Type:

Article

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Computing

Dates:

DateEvent
2011Published

Item ID:

15120

Date Deposited:

01 Dec 2015 09:52

Last Modified:

23 May 2016 16:47

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/15120

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