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The Relationship Between Peer Victimization and Children's Humor Styles: It's No Laughing Matter!

Fox, Claire Louise; Hunter, Simon C. and Jones, Sian. 2014. The Relationship Between Peer Victimization and Children's Humor Styles: It's No Laughing Matter! Social Development, 24(3), pp. 443-461. ISSN 0961205X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This study assessed the concurrent and prospective (fall to spring) associations between peer victimization and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative and self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive and self-defeating). Participants were 1234 adolescents (52 percent female) aged 11–13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports and peer reports of peer victimization were collected, as were self-reports of humor styles. In cross-sectional analyses, peer victimization was associated with all four humor styles, most strongly with self-defeating and affiliative humor. Across the school year, peer victimization was associated with an increase in self-defeating humor and a decrease in affiliative humor (and vice-versa). These results have implications for models of humor development and how we understand the continuity of peer victimization

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1111/sode.12099

Additional Information:

This research was supported by a grant from the Economic and Social Research Council (REF: RES-062-23-2647).

Keywords:

victimization; bullying; longitudinal studies; humor

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology
Psychology > Unit for School and Family Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
10 November 2014Published

Item ID:

16368

Date Deposited:

27 Jan 2016 11:19

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 09:16

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/16368

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