Cerebral Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Music during a Fatiguing Isometric Ankle-Dorsiflexion Task

Bigliassi, Marcelo; Karagheorgis, Costas; Nowicky, Alexander; Orgs, Guido and Wright, Michael. 2016. Cerebral Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Music during a Fatiguing Isometric Ankle-Dorsiflexion Task. Psychophysiology, 54(10), pp. 1472-1483. ISSN 0048-5772 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

The brain mechanisms by which music-related interventions ameliorate fatigue-related symptoms during the execution of fatiguing motor tasks are hitherto under-researched. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of music on brain electrical activity and psychophysiological measures during the execution of an isometric fatiguing ankle-dorsiflexion task performed until the point of volitional exhaustion. Nineteen healthy participants performed two fatigue tests at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction while listening to music or in silence. Electrical activity in the brain was assessed by use of a 64-channel EEG. The results indicated that music down-regulated theta waves in the frontal, central, and parietal regions of the brain during exercise. Music also induced a partial attentional switching from associative thoughts to task-unrelated factors (dissociative thoughts) during exercise, which led to improvements in task performance. Moreover, participants experienced a more positive affective state while performing the isometric task under the influence of music.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12693

Keywords:

Attention; Brain; Music; Muscle fatigue; Psychobiological model

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
27 June 2016Published Online
20 May 2016Accepted
1 October 2016Published

Item ID:

18491

Date Deposited:

07 Jun 2016 10:19

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 16:18

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/18491

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