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Placing Job Characteristics in Context: Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis of Changes in Job Characteristics Since 1975

Wegman, L. A.; Hoffman, B. J; Carter, N. T.; Twenge, J. M. and Guenole, Nigel. 2018. Placing Job Characteristics in Context: Cross-Temporal Meta-Analysis of Changes in Job Characteristics Since 1975. Journal of Management, 44(1), pp. 352-386. ISSN 0149-2063 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Despite frequent references to “the changing nature of work,” little empirical research has investigated proposed changes in work context perceptions. To address this gap, this study uses a cross-temporal meta-analysis to examine changes in five core job characteristics (e.g., task identity, task significance, skill variety, autonomy, and feedback from the job) as well as changes in the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction. An additional analysis of primary data is used to examine changes in two items related to interdependence. On average, workers perceived greater levels of skill variety and autonomy since 1975 and interdependence since 1985. In contrast, the results of a supplemental meta-analysis did not support significant changes in the association between the five core job characteristics and satisfaction over time. Thus, although there is some evidence for change in job characteristics, the findings do not support a change in the value placed on enriched work. Implications for researchers and organizations navigating the modern world of work are highlighted.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206316654545

Keywords:

job characteristics, changing nature of work, skill variety, autonomy, task significance, task identity, feedback, interdependence, job satisfaction, cross-temporal meta-analysis

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Institute of Management Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
8 May 2016Accepted
29 June 2016Published Online
1 January 2018Published

Item ID:

18561

Date Deposited:

13 Jun 2016 09:12

Last Modified:

13 Aug 2018 15:43

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/18561

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