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Goldsmiths - University of London

Highly suggestible individuals exhibit reduced metacognition of agency

Terhune, Devin Blair; Hedman, Love and UNSPECIFIED. 2017. Highly suggestible individuals exhibit reduced metacognition of agency. Cognition, 168, pp. 176-181. ISSN 0010-0277 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

A disruption in the sense of agency is the primary phenomenological feature of response to hypnotic suggestions but its cognitive basis remains elusive. Here we tested the proposal that distorted volition during response to suggestions arises from poor metacognition pertaining to the sources of one’s control. Highly suggestible and control participants completed a motor task in which performance was reduced through surreptitious manipulations of cursor lag and stimuli speed. Highly suggestible participants did not differ from controls in performance or metacognition of performance, but their sense of agency was less sensitive to cursor lag manipulations, suggesting reduced awareness that their control was being manipulated. These results indicate that highly suggestible individuals have aberrant metacognition of agency and may be a valuable population for studying distortions in the sense of agency.

Item Type: Article

Identification Number (DOI):

10.1016/j.cognition.2017.06.026

Additional Information:

This work was supported by a bursary from the Bial Foundation (198/12) and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Intra-European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme to DBT.

Keywords:

Agency; Hypnosis; Hypnotizability; Metacognition; Schizotypy; Volition

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
27 June 2017Accepted
10 July 2017Published Online
November 2017Published

Item ID:

20733

Date Deposited:

11 Jul 2017 08:36

Last Modified:

11 Jul 2017 08:37

URI: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/20733

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