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Relationships between two dimensions of employee perfectionism, postwork cognitive processing, and work day functioning

Flaxman, Paul E.; Stride, Christopher B.; Söderberg, Mia; Lloyd, Joda; Guenole, Nigel and Bond, Frank W.. 2018. Relationships between two dimensions of employee perfectionism, postwork cognitive processing, and work day functioning. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 27(1), pp. 56-69. ISSN 1359-432X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This daily diary study examined relations between two distinct perfectionism dimensions and work-related cognitions experienced by employees during evening leisure time. Drawing from perseverative cognitive processing theory, we hypothesized that perfectionistic concerns would be related to work-related worry and rumination during postwork evenings. In contrast, we hypothesized that a theoretically more adaptive perfectionist dimension (perfectionistic strivings) would be associated with positively valenced self-reflections about work across consecutive evenings. A sample of 148 full-time workers completed an initial survey, which included a trait perfectionism measure, reported their work-related cognitions across four consecutive evenings of a working week, rated their sleep quality immediately upon awakening on each subsequent morning, and their daily levels of emotional exhaustion and work engagement at the end of each work day. Results showed that perfectionistic concerns were indirectly negatively associated with sleep quality and work day functioning via the tendency to worry and ruminate about work. In contrast, perfectionistic strivings were indirectly positively associated with work day engagement via the propensity to experience positive thoughts about work during evening leisure time. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2017.1391792

Keywords:

Perfectionism, perseverative cognition, sleep, burnout, engagement

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Institute of Management Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
10 October 2017Accepted
19 October 2017Published Online
2018Published

Item ID:

22166

Date Deposited:

07 Nov 2017 14:43

Last Modified:

19 Oct 2018 01:26

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/22166

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