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The efficacy of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood may depend on individual differences including age and trait mood

Evans, Carys; Banissy, Michael J. and Charlton, Rebecca A. 2018. The efficacy of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood may depend on individual differences including age and trait mood. Clinical Neurophysiology, 129(6), pp. 1201-1208. ISSN 1388-2457 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Objectives: To assess whether changes in brain microstructures associated with ageing and presence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) reduce the efficacy of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) improving mood in euthymic older adults.

Methods: Using excitatory high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) over bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the effect on mood was assessed in euthymic young adults (YA), older adults (HOA) and older adults with CVRF (OVR). Active-tRNS or sham was applied over two sessions. Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and Warwick Edinburgh
Mental Well-being Scale measured self-reported state mood before and after stimulation. Trait mood was also measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale.

Results: Response to tRNS seemed dependent on individual differences in age and trait mood. In HOA, more negative trait mood was associated with more positive mood change after tRNS. OVR showed a similar but reduced pattern of mood change to HOA. In YA, more positive trait mood was associated with greater positive mood change after tRNS.

Conclusions: Age and trait mood may be important factors when examining the efficacy of tES as an alternative treatment for depression.

Significance: Future studies should consider how response to tES is affected by individual differences.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2018.03.012

Additional Information:

The authors wish to thank all who participated in this study. The study was funded by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R361/0514). None of the authors have potential conflicts of interest to be disclosed.

Keywords:

Transcranial random noise stimulation, brain stimulation, aging, cardiovascular risk, depression

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
10 March 2018Accepted
30 March 2018Published Online
June 2018Published

Item ID:

23067

Date Deposited:

27 Mar 2018 16:44

Last Modified:

05 Dec 2018 14:32

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/23067

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