Research Online

Logo

Goldsmiths - University of London

How serially organized working memory information interacts 3 with timing

Cappelletti, Marinella. 2016. How serially organized working memory information interacts 3 with timing. Psychological Research, 81(6), pp. 1255-1263. ISSN 0340-0727 [Article]

No full text available
[img] Text
426_2016_81DeBelderEtAl_TimeWorkingMemoryPsychologicalResearch.pdf
Permissions: Administrator Access Only

Download (1MB)

Abstract or Description

The temporary storage of serial order information in working memory (WM) has been demonstrated to be crucial to higher order cognition. The previous studies have shown that the maintenance of serial order can be a consequence of the construction of position markers to which to-be-remembered information will be bound. However, the nature of these position markers remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate the crucial involvement of time in the construction of these markers by establishing a bidirectional relationship. First, results of the first experiment show that the initial items in WM result in faster responding after shorter time presentations, while we observe the opposite for items stored further in WM. Second, in the next experiment, we observe an effect of temporal cueing on WM retrieval; longer time cues facilitate responding to later WM items compared with items stored at the beginning of WM. These findings are discussed in the context of position marker theories, reviewing the functional involvement of time in the construction of these markers and its association with space.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-016-0816-8

Additional Information:

This work is supported by Grant G.O226.13N by FWO (Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek)

Keywords:

Serial Position, Work Memory, Serial Recall, Serial Order,Position Marker

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Cognitive Neuroscience Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
17 October 2016Published Online
8 October 2016Accepted

Item ID:

23621

Date Deposited:

25 Jul 2018 15:39

Last Modified:

26 Jul 2018 18:37

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/23621

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)