Research Online

Logo

Goldsmiths - University of London

Dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and insomnia symptoms in early adulthood: A twin and sibling study

Schneider, Melanie N.; Kovas, Yulia and Gregory, Alice M.. 2019. Dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and insomnia symptoms in early adulthood: A twin and sibling study. Journal of Sleep Research, 28(4), ISSN 0962-1105 [Article]

[img]
Preview
Text
6R_DBAS_Manuscript_20190115_NoTrackedChanges (2).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (270kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
6R_DBAS_Online Supplement_20190115 (1).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (404kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
6R_DBAS_Tables_20190115 (1).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (138kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
6R_MNS_DBAS_figures_20190115 (1).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (200kB) | Preview

Abstract or Description

This study examines the associations between dysfunctional belief about sleep (DBAS), its subtypes and insomnia symptoms and estimates the relative contribution of genetic and environmental influences to these variables and the associations between them. The data came from G1219, a twin/sibling study that comprises 862 individuals (aged 22–32 years, 34% male). The Insomnia Symptoms Questionnaire was used to measure insomnia symptoms and a 10‐item version of the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale was used to assess DBAS. A higher DBAS score was associated with more insomnia symptoms. Overall DBAS showed a mainly non‐shared environmental influence (86%). The genetic correlation between overall DBAS and insomnia symptoms was large but not significant, the shared environmental correlation was very small, negative and not significant, whereas a moderate, significant overlap in the non‐shared environmental influences was evident (non‐shared environmental correlation = 0.32). For the association between the subscales of DBAS and insomnia symptoms no significant overlap for genetic (weak to strong associations) or shared environmental factors (very weak negative to strong associations) was indicated. Most of the non‐shared environmental influences on the four variables were significantly moderately correlated (non‐shared environmental correlation = 0.24–0.46). These findings help to deepen our understanding of cognitive theories of insomnia by dissecting one of its crucial elements and illuminating the factors involved in its association with insomnia symptoms.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.12834

Additional Information:

Waves 1-3 funded by the W T Grant Foundation, the University of London Central Research Fund and a Medical Research Council Training Fellowship (G81/343) and Career Development Award to Thalia C. Eley. Wave 4 supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (RES-000-22-2206) and the Institute of Social Psychiatry (06/07 – 11) to Alice M. Gregory. Wave 5 was supported by funding to Alice M. Gregory by the Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths University of London.

Keywords:

dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, environmental influence, genetic influence, insomnia, sleep, twins

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
24 January 2019Accepted
14 March 2019Published Online
11 July 2019Published

Item ID:

25683

Date Deposited:

30 Jan 2019 10:13

Last Modified:

18 Mar 2020 02:14

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/25683

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)