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An experimental examination of the effects of alcohol consumption and exposure to misleading post event information on remembering a hypothetical rape scenario

Flowe, Heather D.; Humphries, Joyce; Takarangi, Melanie; Zelek, Kasia; Karoğlu, Nilda; Gabbert, Fiona and Hope, Lorraine. 2019. An experimental examination of the effects of alcohol consumption and exposure to misleading post event information on remembering a hypothetical rape scenario. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 33(3), pp. 393-413. ISSN 0888-4080 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

We experimentally examined the effects of alcohol consumption and exposure to misleading post event information on memory for a hypothetical interactive rape scenario. We used a 2 beverage (alcohol versus tonic water) x 2 expectancy (told alcohol versus told tonic) factorial design. Participants (N = 80) were randomly assigned to conditions. They consumed alcohol (mean BAC = .06%) or tonic water before engaging in the scenario. Alcohol expectancy was controlled by telling participants they were consuming alcohol or tonic water alone, irrespective of the actual beverage they were consuming. Approximately a week later, participants were exposed to a misleading post event narrative and then recalled the scenario and took a recognition test. Participants who were told that they had consumed alcohol rather than tonic reported fewer correct details; but, they were no more likely to report incorrect or misleading information. The confidence-accuracy relationship for control and misled items was similar across groups, and there was some evidence that metacognitive discrimination was better for participants who were told that they had consumed alcohol compared to those told they had tonic water. Implications for interviewing rape victims are discussed.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3531

Additional Information:

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: An experimental examination of the effects of alcohol consumption and exposure to misleading post event information on remembering a hypothetical rape scenario, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3531. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

This research was funded by an Economic and Social Research Council grant award (ES/J005169/1) to Heather D. Flowe and Melanie Takarangi

Keywords:

alcohol, misinformation effect, self‐administered interview, cognitive interview, rape, sexual assault

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology
Psychology > Forensic Psychology Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
28 January 2019Accepted
6 February 2019Published Online
May 2019Published

Item ID:

25846

Date Deposited:

20 Feb 2019 10:38

Last Modified:

22 Jun 2019 17:52

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/25846

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