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Adults with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder selectively process early visual, but not tactile information during action preparation. An electrophysiological study.

Job, Xavier; Brady, Daniel; De Fockert, J. W.; Di Bernardi Luft, Caroline; Hill, Elisabeth L. and Van Velzen, Jose L.. 2019. Adults with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder selectively process early visual, but not tactile information during action preparation. An electrophysiological study. Human Movement Science, 66, pp. 631-644. ISSN 0167-9457 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental condition affecting motor coordination in children and adults. Here, EEG signals elicited by visual and tactile stimuli were recorded while adult participants with and without probable DCD (pDCD) performed a motor task. The task cued reaching movements towards a location in visible peripersonal space as well as an area of unseen personal space. Event-related potentials elicited by visual and tactile stimuli revealed that visual processing was strongly affected by movement preparation in the pDCD group, even more than in controls. However, in contrast to the controls, tactile processing in unseen space was unaffected by movement preparation in the pDCD group. The selective use of sensory information from vision and proprioception is fundamental for the adaptive control of movements, and these findings suggest that this is impaired in DCD. Additionally, the pDCD group showed attenuated motor rhythms (beta: 13-30Hz) over sensorimotor regions following cues to prepare movements towards unseen personal space. The results reveal that individuals with pDCD exhibit differences in the neural mechanisms of spatial selection and action preparation compared to controls, which may underpin the sustained difficulties they experience. These findings provide new insights into the neural mechanisms potentially disrupted in this highly prevalent disorder.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2019.02.018

Additional Information:

This work was supported by a doctoral studentship awarded to XEJ provided by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), UK.

Keywords:

DCD, Somatosensory, Beta, Body

Related URLs:

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Cognitive Neuroscience Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
27 February 2019Accepted
10 April 2019Published Online
August 2019Published

Item ID:

25910

Date Deposited:

24 Apr 2019 08:34

Last Modified:

04 Aug 2019 02:45

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/25910

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