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Stalking: How perceptions differ from reality and why these differences matter

Scott, A.J.. 2020. Stalking: How perceptions differ from reality and why these differences matter. In: Ray Bull and Iris Blandón-Gitlin, eds. The Routledge International Handbook of Legal and Investigative Psychology. Abingdon: Routledge. ISBN 9780367345570 [Book Section]

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Abstract or Description

Stalking is a particular type of interpersonal aggression that is difficult to define because it incorporates a range of unwanted behaviours over a protracted period of time that often appear routine and harmless when considered on an incident-by-incident basis. Defining stalking is further complicated because people’s perceptions are integral to determining whether a particular course of conduct constitutes stalking, whether victims identify their own experiences as stalking, and whether support networks and law officials identify other people’s experiences as stalking. This chapter outlines the difficulties associated with defining and legislating against stalking, and reviews literature examining the influence of various personal and situational characteristics on perceptions of stalking. It then considers how perceptions differ from reality and why these differences matter.

Item Type:

Book Section

Additional Information:

"This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in The Routledge International Handbook of Legal and Investigative Psychology on 11 October 2019, available online: https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-International-Handbook-of-Legal-and-Investigative-Psychology/Bull-Blandon-Gitlin/p/book/9780367345570”

Keywords:

stalking, perception

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Forensic Psychology Unit

Dates:

DateEvent
2 April 2019Accepted
2020Published

Item ID:

26591

Date Deposited:

15 Jul 2019 14:42

Last Modified:

22 Jan 2020 17:47

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/26591

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