Anomalous experiences are more prevalent among highly suggestible individuals who are also highly dissociative

David, Acunzo; Etzel, Cardeña and Terhune, Devin Blair. 2020. Anomalous experiences are more prevalent among highly suggestible individuals who are also highly dissociative. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 25(3), pp. 179-189. ISSN 1354-6805 [Article]

No full text available
[img] Text
Acunzo_CN_100120.pdf - Accepted Version
Permissions: Administrator Access Only until 20 January 2021.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (618kB)

Abstract or Description

Introduction: Predictive coding models propose that high hypnotic suggestibility confers a predisposition to hallucinate due to an elevated propensity to weight perceptual beliefs (priors) over sensory evidence. Multiple lines of research corroborate this prediction and demonstrate a link between hypnotic suggestibility and proneness to anomalous perceptual states. However, such effects might be moderated by dissociative tendencies, which seem to account for heterogeneity in high hypnotic suggestibility. We tested the prediction that the prevalence of anomalous experiences would be greater among highly suggestible individuals who are also highly dissociative.

Methods: We compared high and low dissociative highly suggestible participants and low suggestible controls on multiple psychometric measures of anomalous experiences.

Results: High dissociative highly suggestible participants reliably reported greater anomalous experiences than low dissociative highly suggestible participants and low suggestible controls, who did not significantly differ from each other.

Conclusions: These results suggest a greater predisposition to experience anomalous perceptual states among high dissociative highly suggestible individuals.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2020.1715932

Additional Information:

The data that support the findings of this study are openly available in Open Science Framework at osf.io/cfa3r.

“This is an original manuscript / preprint of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry on 20 January 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13546805.2020.1715932.”

Keywords:

dissociation, hallucination, hypnosis; hypnotizability, perception, sleep

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
6 January 2020Accepted
20 January 2020Published Online
2020Published

Item ID:

28018

Date Deposited:

10 Jan 2020 16:48

Last Modified:

18 Apr 2020 10:02

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/28018

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)