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Causally Linking Neural Dominance to Perceptual Dominance in a Multisensory Conflict

Yun, Kyongsik; Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Sandkühler, Simone; Lin, Yong-Jun; Iwaki, Sunao and Shimojo, Shinsuke. 2020. Causally Linking Neural Dominance to Perceptual Dominance in a Multisensory Conflict. NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965 [Article] (Forthcoming)

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Abstract or Description

When different senses are in conflict, one sense may dominate the perception of other sense, but it is not known whether the sensory cortex associated with the dominant modality exerts directional influence, at the functional brain level, over the sensory cortex associated with the dominated modality; in short, the link between sensory dominance and neuronal dominance is not established. In a task involving audio-visual conflict, using magnetoencephalography recordings in humans, we first demonstrated that the neuronal dominance – auditory cortex functionally influencing visual cortex – was associated with the sensory dominance – sound qualitatively altering visual perception. Further, we found that pre-stimulus auditory-to-visual connectivity could predict the perceptual outcome on a trial-by-trial basis. Subsequently, we performed an effective connectivity-guided neurofeedback electroencephalography experiment and showed that participants who were briefly trained to increase the neuronal dominance from auditory to visual cortex showed higher sensory, i.e. auditory, dominance during the conflict task immediately after the training. These results shed new light into the interactive neuronal nature of multisensory integration and open up exciting opportunities by enhancing or suppressing targeted mental functions subserved by effective connectivity.

Item Type:

Article

Additional Information:

This work was partially supported by the ERATO “Implicit Brain Function” project, Japan Science and Technology Agency.

Related URLs:

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
10 June 2020Accepted

Item ID:

28762

Date Deposited:

11 Jun 2020 15:09

Last Modified:

12 Jun 2020 00:27

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/28762

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