Research Online

Logo

Goldsmiths - University of London

Shakespeare's Nature and the Cultivation of Culture

Scott, Charlotte. 2013. Shakespeare's Nature and the Cultivation of Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-968508-0 [Book]

[img]
Preview
Image
9780199685080_450.jpg - Cover Image

Download (35kB) | Preview

Abstract or Description

Shakespeare's Nature offers the first sustained account of the impact of the language and practice of husbandry on Shakespeare's work. It shows how the early modern discourse of cultivation changes attitude to the natural world, and traces the interrelationships between the human and the natural worlds in Shakespeare's work through dramatic and poetic models of intervention, management, prudence and profit. Ranging from the Sonnets to The Tempest, the book explains how cultivation of the land responds to and reinforces social welfare, and reveals the extent to which the dominant industry of Shakespeare's time shaped a new language of social relations. Beginning with an examination of the rise in the production of early modern printed husbandry manuals, Shakespeare's Nature draws on the varied fields of economic, agrarian, humanist, Christian and literary studies, showing how the language of husbandry redefined Elizabethan attitudes to both the human and non-human worlds. In a series of close readings of specific plays and poems, this book explains how cultivation forms and develops social and economic value systems, and how the early modern imagination was dependent on metaphors of investment, nurture and growth. By tracing this language of intervention and creation in Shakespeare's work, this book reveals a fundamental discourse in the development of early modern social, political and personal values.

Item Type:

Book

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

English and Comparative Literature

Date:

2013

Item ID:

3729

Date Deposited:

15 Nov 2011 14:34

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2017 10:18

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/3729

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)