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Goldsmiths - University of London

Embodying Affect: Voice-hearing, Telepathy, Suggestion and Modelling the Non-conscious

Blackman, Lisa. 2010. Embodying Affect: Voice-hearing, Telepathy, Suggestion and Modelling the Non-conscious. Body & Society, 16(1), pp. 163-192. ISSN 1357-034X [Article]

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Abstract or Description

This article takes a genealogical approach to the problem of affective communication that we find coalescing around the phenomenon of ‘affective transfer’ identified in experiences such as voice-hearing, telepathy and hypnotic suggestion. These experiences breach the boundaries between the self and other, inside and outside, and material and immaterial, and make visible some of the central issues that are important in re-thinking affect, relationality and embodiment. The article will attempt to re-engage the problematic of subjectivity by asking what a turn to affect entails within such technologies of listening and attention. This is particularly important when such turning or opening to affect engenders a conversation with traumatic memories, albeit a conversation that does not occur primarily in a verbal register. The key focus will be on the marginalized status of telepathic modalities of affective transfer throughout the histories of the development of the psychological sciences. The article uses this as a platform to consider the connections between what is occluded or excluded from the psychological sciences, and what is being silenced within work on affect taking form across the humanities. Taking us back to the practice of telepathy in the 19th century and the problem of hypnotic suggestion in the mid 20th century (the Macy Conferences), the article discloses how both function as carriers of what is being overlooked and silenced in the engagement by many affect scholars with the knowledge-practices of the psychological and neurosciences.

Item Type: Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1177/1357034X09354356

Keywords:

assemblages, body, embodiment, James, psychology

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Media and Communications
Research Office > REF2014

Dates:

DateEvent
June 2010Published

Item ID:

5980

Date Deposited:

13 Oct 2011 13:01

Last Modified:

27 Jun 2017 13:42

URI: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/5980

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