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Millet Legacies in a National Environment: Political Elites and Muslim Communities in Greece, 1830s-1923

Katsikas, Stefanos. 2012. Millet Legacies in a National Environment: Political Elites and Muslim Communities in Greece, 1830s-1923. In: Benjamin C Fortna; Stefanos Katsikas; Dimitris Kamouzis and Paraskevas Konortas, eds. State-Nationalisms in the Ottoman Empire, Greece and Turkey: Orthodox and Muslims (1830-1945). London and New York: SOAS/Routledge Studies Series, pp. 52-74. ISBN 978-0-415-69056-0 [Book Section]

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Abstract or Description

This chapter explores the relations between Greece’s political elites and its Muslim communities from the country’s foundation as an independent state to the end of the Anatolian War (1919-1922). These relations have ranged from estrangement and enmity, in times of war, to coexistence by necessity, in times of peace. Though shaped in a post-Ottoman environment and driven by contemporary dynamics, these relations were also influenced by experiences under the Ottoman millet system in two major ways: a) By emphasising religion in one’s self-identity, this system set the foundations for a close interconnection between Orthodox Christianity and Greek national identity, which in turn justified policies of exclusion, persecution, extermination and expulsion of Muslims in the process of crafting Modern Greece; b) it served as a base on which Greek political elites organised and administered the country’s Muslim communities.

Item Type:

Book Section

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

History

Dates:

DateEvent
November 2012Published

Item ID:

6290

Date Deposited:

21 Nov 2012 16:14

Last Modified:

17 Jul 2018 09:05

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/6290

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