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Remapping Place and Narrative in Native American Literature: David Treuer's "The Hiawatha"

Kirwan, Padraig. 2007. Remapping Place and Narrative in Native American Literature: David Treuer's "The Hiawatha". American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 31(2), pp. 1-24. ISSN 0161-6463 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

David Treuer's 1997 novel, "The Hiawatha," engages the traditional literary strategies employed by Native American writing, compares those strategies to earlier narratives (Native American and canonically American), offers a reassessment of indigenous novelistic structures, engages critical responses to tribal fiction, and does so in response to current discursive debate within the field of Native American literary studies. In this essay, the author aims to explicate Treuer's use of that style and how this usage facilitates a fresh sense of space within Native American fiction. Most particularly, this essay will examine a sense of space that makes palpable the potential directions open to tribal literatures and attendant criticism while remapping existing images of place and subverting notions of homecoming.

Item Type:

Article

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

English and Comparative Literature

Dates:

DateEvent
2007Published

Item ID:

6424

Date Deposited:

05 Mar 2012 11:31

Last Modified:

26 Jun 2017 09:16

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/6424

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