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Science in the Making: Right Hand, Left Hand. III: Estimating historical rates of left-handedness

McManus, I. C.; Moore, James W.; Freegard, Matthew and Rawles, Richard. 2010. Science in the Making: Right Hand, Left Hand. III: Estimating historical rates of left-handedness. Laterality, 15(1-2), pp. 186-208. ISSN 1464-0678 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

The BBC television programme Right Hand, Left Hand, broadcast in August 1953, used a postal questionnaire to ask viewers about their handedness. Respondents were born between 1864 and 1948, and in principle therefore the study provides information on rates of left-handedness in those born in the nineteenth century, a group for which few data are otherwise available. A total of 6,549 responses were received, with an overall rate of left-handedness of 15.2%, which is substantially above that expected for a cohort born in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Left-handers are likely to respond preferentially to surveys about handedness, and the extent of over-response can be estimated in modern control data obtained from a handedness website, from the 1953 BBC data, and from Crichton-Browne's 1907 survey, in which there was also a response bias. Response bias appears to have been growing, being relatively greater in the most modern studies. In the 1953 data there is also evidence that left-handers were more common among later rather than early responders, suggesting that left-handers may have been specifically recruited into the study, perhaps by other left-handers who had responded earlier. In the present study the estimated rate of bias was used to correct the nineteenth-century BBC data, which was then combined with other available data as a mixture of two constrained Weibull functions, to obtain an overall estimate of handedness rates in the nineteenth century. The best estimates are that left-handedness was at its nadir of about 3% for those born between about 1880 and 1900. Extrapolating backwards, the rate of left-handedness in the eighteenth century was probably about 10%, with the decline beginning in about 1780, and reaching around 7% in about 1830, although inevitably there are many uncertainties in those estimates. What does seem indisputable is that rates of left-handedness fell during most of the nineteenth century, only subsequently to rise in the twentieth century.

Item Type: Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/13576500802565313

Keywords:

handedness, rate, historical, nineteenth century, response bias

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2010Published

Item ID:

6470

Date Deposited:

10 Feb 2012 14:53

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 10:13

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/6470
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