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Sleep items in the Child Behavior Checklist: A comparison with sleep diaries, actigraphy and polysomnography in a sample of anxious, depressed and control youth.

Gregory, Alice M.; Cousins, Jennifer C.; Forbes, Erika E.; Trubnick, Laura; Ryan, Neal D.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Sadeh, Avi and Dahl, Ronald E.. 2011. Sleep items in the Child Behavior Checklist: A comparison with sleep diaries, actigraphy and polysomnography in a sample of anxious, depressed and control youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 50, pp. 499-507. ISSN 0890-8567 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Objective: The Child Behavior Checklist is sometimes used to assess sleep disturbance despite not having been validated for this purpose. This study examined associations between the Child Behavior Checklist sleep items and other measures of sleep.

Method: Participants were 122 youth (61% female, aged 7 through 17 years) with anxiety disorders (19%), major depressive disorder (9%), both anxiety and depression (26%), or a negative history of any psychiatric disorder (46%). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist and children completed a sleep diary, wore actigraphs for multiple nights, and spent 2 nights in the sleep laboratory. Partial correlations ([pr], controlling for age, gender and diagnostic status) were used to examine associations.

Results: Child Behavior Checklist sleep items were associated with several other sleep variables. For example, “trouble sleeping” correlated significantly with sleep latency assessed by both diary (pr(113) = 0.25, p = .008) and actigraphy (pr(105) = 0.21, p = .029). Other expected associations were not found (e.g., “sleeps more than most kids” was not significantly correlated with EEG-assessed total sleep time: pr(84) = 0.12, p = .258).

Conclusions: Assessing sleep using the Child Behavior Checklist exclusively is not ideal. Nonetheless, certain Child Behavior Checklist items (e.g., “trouble sleeping”) may be valuable. Although the Child Behavior Checklist may provide a means of examining some aspects of sleep from existing datasets that do not include other measures of sleep, hypotheses generated from such analyses need to be tested using more rigorous measures of sleep.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2011.02.003

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2011Published

Item ID:

7020

Date Deposited:

06 Jul 2012 12:32

Last Modified:

13 Jul 2018 15:32

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/7020

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