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Influence of Time to Change's social marketing interventions on stigma in England 2009-2011

Evans-Lacko, S.; Malcolm, E.; West, Keon; Rose, D.; London, J.; Rusch, N.; Little, K.; Henderson, C. and Thornicroft, G.. 2013. Influence of Time to Change's social marketing interventions on stigma in England 2009-2011. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 202(s55), s77-s88. ISSN 0007-1250 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Background

England’s Time To Change (TTC) social marketing campaign emphasised social contact between people with and without mental health problems to reduce stigma and discrimination.

Aims

We aimed to assess the effectiveness of the mass media component and also that of the mass social contact events.

Method

Online interviews were performed before and after each burst of mass media social marketing to evaluate changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour and associations between campaign awareness and outcomes. Participants at social contact events were asked about the occurrence and quality of contact, attitudes, readiness to discuss mental health and intended behaviour towards people with mental health problems.

Results

Prompted campaign awareness was 38-64%. A longitudinal improvement was noted for one intended behaviour item but not for knowledge or attitudes. Campaign awareness was positively associated with greater knowledge (β = 0.80, 95% CI 0.52-1.08) and more favourable attitudes (commonality OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.10-1.70; dangerousness OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.22-1.63) and intended behaviour (β = 0.75, 95% CI 0.53-0.96). Social contact at events demonstrated a positive impact (M = 2.68) v. no contact (M = 2.42) on perceived attitude change; t(211) = 3.30, P = 0.001. Contact quality predicted more positive attitude change (r = 0.33, P<0.01) and greater confidence to challenge stigma (r = 0.38, P<0.01).

Conclusions

The favourable short-term consequences of the social marketing campaign suggest that social contact can be used by anti-stigma programmes to reduce stigma.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.113.126672

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
2013Published

Item ID:

9209

Date Deposited:

25 Oct 2013 09:14

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 13:58

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/9209

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