A longitudinal twin and sibling study of associations between insomnia and depression symptoms in young adults

Gregory, Alice M.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Eley, Thalia C.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Schneider, Melanie N.; Parsons, Michael J. and Barclay, Nicola L.. 2016. A longitudinal twin and sibling study of associations between insomnia and depression symptoms in young adults. Sleep, 39(11), pp. 1985-1992. ISSN 0161-8105 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Study objectives: To estimate genetic and environmental influences on the associations between insomnia and depression symptoms concurrently and longitudinally.
Design: Longitudinal twin/ sibling study.
Setting: Population based twin/ sibling registry from the U.K.
Patients or Participants: One thousand five hundred and fifty six twins and siblings participated at Time 1 (mean age = 20.3 years, SD = 1.76). Eight hundred and sixty two participated at Time 2 (mean age = 25.2 years, SD = 1.73 years).
Interventions: N/A
Measurements and Results: The Insomnia Symptoms Questionnaire and the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire were used to assess symptoms of insomnia and depression respectively. Genetic effects accounted for 33-41% of the variance of the phenotypes. The phenotypic correlations were moderate (r = .34 to r = .52). The genetic correlations between the variables were high (.73 – 1.00). Genetic effects accounted for a substantial proportion of the associations between variables (50-90%). Non-shared environmental effects explained the rest of the variance and covariance of the traits.
Conclusions: While genetic effects play a modest role in insomnia and depression symptoms separately, they appear to play a more central role in concurrent and longitudinal associations between these phenotypes. This should be acknowledged in theories explaining these common associations.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.6228

Additional Information:

Waves 1-3 funded by the W T Grant Foundation, the University of London Central Research fund and a Medical Research Council Training Fellowship (G81/343) and Career Development Award to Thalia C. Eley. Wave 4 supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (RES-000-22-2206) and the Institute of Social Psychiatry (06/07 – 11) to Alice M. Gregory. Wave 5 supported by funding from Goldsmiths, University of London to Alice M. Gregory.

Keywords:

Insomnia, Depression, Genetics, Twins, Longitudinal

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Unit for School and Family Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
18 July 2016Accepted
1 November 2016Published Online

Item ID:

18754

Date Deposited:

19 Jul 2016 09:34

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 16:20

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/18754

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