The surprising politics of anti-immigrant prejudice: How political conservatism moderates the effect of immigrant race and religion on infrahumanisation judgements

Banton, Olivia; West, Keon and Kinney, Ellie. 2020. The surprising politics of anti-immigrant prejudice: How political conservatism moderates the effect of immigrant race and religion on infrahumanisation judgements. British Journal of Social Psychology, 59(1), pp. 157-170. ISSN 0144-6665 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Attitudes towards immigrants in the UK are worsening. It has been posited that these attitudes may reflect covert racial and religious prejudices, particularly among conservatives. To investigate this, two studies examined the role that immigrant race (Black/White; Study 1) and immigrant religion (Muslim/non-Muslim; Study 2) played in immigrant infrahumanisation judgements, using political conservatism as a moderating variable. There was a moderating effect of political conservatism; however, it was not in the predicted direction. The results of both studies indicated that immigrant race (Black) and immigrant religion (Muslim) predicted greater infrahumanisation when political conservatism was low. Conservatives infrahumanised all immigrants equally (and more than liberals), but liberals were more sensitive to racial/religious biases in their evaluations of immigrants.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12337

Keywords:

immigration, race, religion, political conservatism, infrahumanisation, realistic threat

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
22 July 2019Accepted
30 July 2019Published Online
2 January 2020Published

Item ID:

26658

Date Deposited:

24 Jul 2019 14:44

Last Modified:

09 Aug 2020 14:33

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/26658

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