Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (Homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

Whiten, Andrew; Custance, Deborah M.; Gomez, Juan-Carlos; Teixidor, Patricia and Bard, Kim. 1996. Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (Homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 110(1), pp. 3-14. ISSN 0735-7036 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Observational learning in chimpanzees and young children was investigated using an artificial fruit designed as an analog of natural foraging problems faced by primates. Each of 3 principal components could be removed in 2 alternative ways, demonstration of only one of which was watched by each subject. This permitted subsequent imitation by subjects to be distinguished from stimulus enhancement. Children aged 2–4 years evidenced imitation for 2 components, but also achieved demonstrated outcomes through their own techniques. Chimpanzees relied even more on their own techniques, but they did imitate elements of 1 component of the task. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence of chimpanzee imitation in a functional task designed to simulate foraging behavior hypothesized to be transmitted culturally in the wild.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1037/0735-7036.110.1.3

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
March 1996Published

Item ID:

5095

Date Deposited:

04 Mar 2011 10:06

Last Modified:

30 Jun 2017 14:35

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/5095

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